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Cats dislike change

Getting a baby brings along many changes, for you as well as for your cat. Your feline will suddenly have to get used to new sounds, new scents, new objects around the house, and probably a completely new routine. Cats are creatures of habit, and while some might find the tiny human a fun addition to the household, others might be more hesitant. That’s why taking things slowly is key to having a happy kitty.

Introduce furniture ahead of time

Getting a baby involves getting a ton of new items, including pieces of furniture such as a cot, a cradle, and perhaps an entire room that gets refurbished. Place any baby furniture in their final spot well ahead of time to let your cat get used to them. Just don’t allow your cat to crawl into pieces of furniture that they won’t be allowed into any longer once the baby has arrived. 

Introduce furniture ahead of time

Allow your cat to welcome the baby

Introduce the newborn to your cat in a quiet room, preferably one where the cat doesn’t come often. This way, they won’t see the newborn as an intruder into their territory. Once you found the perfect location, allow your cat to approach and sniff the baby. Most cats will sniff the little one for a while and then walk off. This is a good sign, as it means your cat doesn’t see your baby as a threat. 

Don’t force your cat to interact with the newborn

Cats need some time to get used to new things, so don’t force them to spend time with your newborn. Allow your cat to approach the little one on their own time. Just make sure that you never leave your cat with your newborn unattended. Babies are soft and warm, making them perfect napping companions for cats. While this sounds super cute, your cat could accidentally smother your baby with their fluff. A protective mesh atop the cot or a screen door leading to the baby room could allow you to hear and see your little one while keeping them safe from your sleepy cat.

Don’t force your cat to interact with the newborn